Planned Parenthood Advertisement and Natural Hair

Whatever your political stance is, chances are that you’ve heard of Planned Parenthood. Planned Parenthood sponsored this advertisement I spotted in Essence magazine for breast exams. Did you know that breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among African American women? I definitely didn’t, and it’s very sobering to see this health notice in Essence. One of the things I really like about this advertisement is that the woman with natural hair is not your typical model. She’s not selling you clothes, food, household items, liquor……fill in the blank. Instead, she’s a young doctor and the point of the advertisement is to raise awareness and encourage you to take action.

Source: Essence

Besides breast exams, what else does Planned Parenthood do? Described as “the nation’s leading sexual and reproductive health care provider and advocate”, Planned Parenthood offers health information and services such as abortion, birth control, body image, general health care, men’s sexual health, morning after pill, pregnancy, relationships, sex and sexuality, sexual orientation and gender, sexually transmitted diseases, and women’s health.

Side note: earlier this year, Planned Parenthood made national news after the Susan G. Komen charity announced its plans to pull funding for breast exams from the federation. Apparently, the motivation for the de-funding was an investigation into the federation. Amid a lot of controversy, the charity reversed its decision, and promised to continue funding existing grants for breast cancer screenings. In the days following the foundation’s decision, Planned Parenthood raised almost $1 million, including a $250 million donation from New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg (dang, who knew who had money like that? I definitely didn’t).

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4 thoughts on “Planned Parenthood Advertisement and Natural Hair

  1. Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
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    CDC’s National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) provides breast and cervical cancer screenings and diagnostic services to low-income, uninsured, and underinsured women across the United States.
    Search for free and low-cost screenings in your state (full site)—use the interactive map to find local contacts for breast and cervical cancer screening.
    What Services Does the NBCCEDP Provide?
    The NBCCEDP programs offer the following services for eligible women in your area:
    Clinical breast examinations.
    Mammograms.
    Pap tests.
    Pelvic examinations.
    Diagnostic testing if results are abnormal.
    Referrals to treatment.
    Who Should Get Breast and Cervical Cancer Screenings?
    All women are at risk for breastbreast and cervicalcervical cancer, but regular screenings can prevent or detect these diseases early. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has established the following guidelines for screening, but you should discuss with your health care provider how often you should get screened.
    Breast cancer: Women between 50 and 74 years old should get mammograms every two years. Those under 50 should talk with their provider about when they should be screened.
    Cervical cancer: Women should get their first Pap testPap test at age 21 and continue screening every three years.
    Are You Eligible for Free or Low-Cost Screenings?
    You may be eligible for free or low-cost screenings if you meet these qualifications—
    You are between 40 and 64 years of age for breast cancer screening.
    You are between 18 and 64 years of age for cervical cancer screening.
    You have no insurance, or your insurance does not cover screening exams.
    Your yearly income is at or below 250% of the federal poverty level.
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  2. National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP)
    NBCCEDPFind a Screening Provider Near You
    About the Program

    The NBCCEDP Conceptual FrameworkScreening Program Data

    Screening Program Summaries
    Training

    Breast Cancer Self-Study ModulesWorkplans IntroductionCase StudyGoalsMeasures of SuccessObjectivesActivitiesDataTime FrameTeam Members ResponsibleProgress ReportSummaryCommunity Health Worker Programs Materials
    Legislation

    Breast and Cervical Cancer Prevention and Treatment Act of 2000Breast and Cervical Cancer Mortality Prevention Act of 1990
    Local Program Highlights
    Partners
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    Related Links
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    Cancer HomeNBCCEDP 226 19ShareCompartir
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    Program EligibilityAccomplishmentsScreeningFuture DirectionsReferenceThrough the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides low-income, uninsured, and underserved women access to timely breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services.

    To improve access to screening, Congress passed the Breast and Cervical Cancer Mortality Prevention Act of 1990, which guided CDC in creating the NBCCEDP. Currently, the NBCCEDP funds all 50 states, the District of Columbia, 5 U.S. territories, and 12 American Indian/Alaska Native tribes or tribal organizations to provide screening services for breast and cervical cancer. The program helps low-income, uninsured, and underinsured women gain access to breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services. These services include—

    •Clinical breast examinations.
    •Mammograms.
    •Pap tests.
    •Pelvic examinations.
    •Diagnostic testing if results are abnormal.
    •Referrals to treatment.
    In 2000, Congress passed the Breast and Cervical Cancer Prevention and Treatment Act, which gives states the option to offer women in the NBCCEDP access to treatment through Medicaid. To date, all 50 states and the District of Columbia have approved this Medicaid option. In 2001, with passage of the Native American Breast and Cervical Cancer Treatment Technical Amendment Act, Congress explained that this option also applies to American Indians/Alaska Natives who are eligible for health services provided by the Indian Health Service or by a tribal organization.

    Program Eligibility
    An estimated 9.7%–11% of U.S. women of screening age are eligible to receive NBCCEDP services. Federal guidelines establish an eligibility baseline to direct services to uninsured and underinsured women at or below 250% of federal poverty level; ages 18–64 for cervical screening; ages 40–64 for breast screening.

    Accomplishments
    Since 1991, NBCCEDP-funded programs have served more than 4.2 million women, provided more than 10.4 million breast and cervical cancer screening examinations, and diagnosed more than 54,276 breast cancers, 3,113 invasive cervical cancers, and 144,460 premalignant cervical lesions, of which 41% are high-grade. Approximately 12.5% of NBCCEDP-eligible women aged 40–64 years are screened for breast cancer and 8.5% of eligible women aged 18–64 years are screened for cervical cancer through the program.

    In program year 2011, the NBCCEDP—

    •Screened 333,302 women for breast cancer with mammography and diagnosed 5,655 breast cancers.
    •Screened 283,312 women for cervical cancer with the Pap test and diagnosed 4,695 cervical cancers and high-grade precancerous lesions.
    These and other public health efforts that address breast and cervical cancer support CDC’s overarching goal of healthy people in every stage of life. They also address the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Healthy People 2010 goals of—

    •Reducing the breast cancer death rate by 20%.
    •Reducing the cervical cancer death rate to 2 deaths per 100,000 women.
    •Increasing to 97% the proportion of women who have ever received a Pap test, and to 90% the proportion of women who have received a Pap test in the last 3 years.
    •Increasing to 70% the proportion of women aged 40 years and older who have received a mammogram in the last 2 years.
    To reach underserved women, the NBCCEDP supports an array of strategies, including program management, screening and diagnostic services, data management, quality assurance and quality improvement, evaluation, partnerships, professional development, and recruitment. Providers in the program work collaboratively to provide breast and cervical cancer screening, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment referrals (where appropriate). The program’s continued success depends in large part on the complementary efforts of a variety of national organizations, as well as on state and community partners.

    Screening
    Deaths from breast and cervical cancers could be avoided if cancer screening rates increased among women at risk. Deaths from these diseases occur disproportionately among women who are uninsured or underinsured. Mammography and Pap tests are underused by women who have no source or no regular source of health care, women without health insurance, and women who immigrated to the United States within the past 10 years.1

    Women Screened through the NBCCEDP, by Program Year
    July 2006 to June 2011
    National Aggregate

    See text description of this graph.

    Future Directions
    The Program Services Branch (PSB) of CDC’s Division of Cancer Prevention and Control administers the NBCCEDP and is engaged in strategic planning to set directions and priorities for the future. Achieving program efficiency and effectiveness will continue to be high priorities.

    VISION: Healthy women living cancer-free.

    MISSION: To lead and support breast and cervical cancer screening to save lives.

    GOALS:

    •Reduce breast and cervical cancer mortality through public health approaches.
    •Address environmental factors* to plan, manage, and communicate priorities.
    •Provide the highest level of support to grantees to maximize their performance.
    *Environmental factors are issues that may impact the ability of the PSB to achieve its mission. They include potential reimbursement for more costly new technologies, trends in health care reform and universal coverage, recent evidence of population declines in mammography rates, and increases in the eligible population due to a rise in the number of uninsured women and an aging population.

    Reference
    1Pleis JR, Schiller JS, Benson V. Summary health statistics for U.S. adults: National Health Interview Survey, 2000. Vital and Health Statistics. Series 10, Data from the National Health Survey. 2003;(215):1–132.

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    TTY: (888) 232-6348Contact CDC-INFO
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    EmailPrintUpdatesListenTwitterPage last reviewed: March 5, 2012
    Page last updated: March 5, 2012
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  3. Dear Tiffany. I hope the ladies can find help. If you need me to help to look for places for you or anybody let me know. I lost my fiancé to Ovarian cancer after a 3 year romance back in the mid 1980’s. We never got to be married. So please do all you can to find the help you need for cancer or any health issues. Thanks again Tiffany for letting me post here again. I wish you and all the best. Good luck.

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